Comments for Renaissance Art and Music http://renaissanceartandmusic.com : the space between Mon, 20 Jan 2014 15:25:11 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.com/ Comment on Programme Notes by Mrs Robert Randolph http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2014/01/20/programme-notes/comment-page-1/#comment-1784 Mon, 20 Jan 2014 15:25:11 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=375#comment-1784 A wonderful evening, arranged with all one would. Well done to everyone.

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Comment on Video Pairing: Sir Walter Ralegh (anon) and What is Our Life? (Gibbons) by k lawler http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/02/18/sir-walter-ralegh-anon-and-what-is-our-life-gibbons/comment-page-1/#comment-1716 Wed, 25 Dec 2013 00:59:59 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=173#comment-1716 love this, kathy

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Comment on Guest Blog Post: Ivan Moody by c c wang http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/06/20/guest-post-ivan-moody/comment-page-1/#comment-117 Sat, 22 Jun 2013 14:01:21 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=290#comment-117 It is a tradition to paint ” the mother and the son ” by artists of different ages , places , in all styles and schools to depict the savors brief trip to the world . It is a hard to understand the meaning of every ” mother & son ” that interpret the event by painters.

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Comment on Video Pairing: Two Peters, Philips and Paul Rubens by renaissanceartandmusic http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/06/02/video-pairing-two-peters-philips-and-paul-rubens/comment-page-1/#comment-108 Mon, 03 Jun 2013 13:15:59 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=276#comment-108 I wanted to add that we picked these particular pieces because both subjects are women: Amarilli, mia bella (Phillips’ work is based off a popular Italian song by Caccini about love for a woman named Amarilli) and the sitter of Rubens’ work, thought to be Susanna Lunden, born Susanna Fourment, third daughter of Daniel Fourment, an Antwerp tapestry and silk merchant.

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Comment on Video Pairing: The Ambassadors and Thule, the Period of Cosmography by renaissanceartandmusic http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/24/the-ambassadors-and-thule-the-period-of-cosmography/comment-page-1/#comment-17 Tue, 29 Jan 2013 08:52:07 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=117#comment-17 So true, so true. :)

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Comment on Interdisciplinary Music: playing nice with the other kids by renaissanceartandmusic http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/28/interdisciplinary-music-playing-nice-with-the-other-kids/comment-page-1/#comment-16 Tue, 29 Jan 2013 08:50:51 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=126#comment-16 Particularly difficult in the early modern period, as we have so little remanence about the composers/artists (let alone their intentions!) at all. Thanks for your comment, Maxime!

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Comment on Interdisciplinary Music: playing nice with the other kids by Maxime Rischard http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/28/interdisciplinary-music-playing-nice-with-the-other-kids/comment-page-1/#comment-15 Mon, 28 Jan 2013 23:50:49 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=126#comment-15 It’s so much easier to explain a painting to a layperson than a symphony. You can’t just show them something, you have to convince them that it’s in the music, and that the composer intended it. ‘How do you know?’ Is a hard question to answer.

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Comment on Video Pairing: The Ambassadors and Thule, the Period of Cosmography by Maxime Rischard http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/24/the-ambassadors-and-thule-the-period-of-cosmography/comment-page-1/#comment-14 Mon, 28 Jan 2013 23:45:49 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=117#comment-14 When a certain friend of mine pointed out how the music imitates the swooshing of the flying fishes at 3:30, flying in and out of the water, I think my mind was just about blown. I love the sense of humour in the song and the painting, hundreds of years ahead of the surrealists.

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Comment on Video Pairing: The Ambassadors and Thule, the Period of Cosmography by Harriette Peel http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/24/the-ambassadors-and-thule-the-period-of-cosmography/comment-page-1/#comment-6 Thu, 24 Jan 2013 15:29:47 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=117#comment-6 Part of the intrigue of portraits is their distillation of the person’s identity into historicised stasis. This contradicts the idea of a portraiture’s ‘timelessness’ – for it is not the the individual themselves that is immortalised, rather the way in which they were recorded. Painting can do this especially; the person’s curious two-dimensionality enhances this feeling that the person has become a single memory, a slide, something to skim-read.

Holbein’s Ambassadors is particularly odd in this respect. An inherent sense of movement, indeed a requirement of movement on the part of the viewer in order to view the skull ‘properly’, contrasts markedly with the stillness of the two men and the collection of objects. Take the skull away and you have an incredibly straightforward painting: two men standing either side of some shelves, in the middle of the frame. The two men and their accoutrements are crystallised within the frame, and only the skull-trickery indicates the life and activity that preceded Holbein’s painting.

Music breaks this down. Particularly a piece of contemporary-ish music whose lyrics tie in so interestingly with the subject of the painting. I had a feeling when watching this video that the two men were watching me as I began to engage more intently with the scene they and Holbein had created, as if thinking – finally, you aren’t just glancing over us as if relics from another world. Adding the layer of aural experience to how I view this painting – even in replica on a computer screen – and sitting with it long enough, almost made me feel as if I had been invited into the room to examine the objects in it with them. It also broke down the objectification of the men themselves fundamental to portraiture.

Katie, Matt, other musicologists: what’s the story behind the piece of music – where would it have been played, and who for? etc

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Comment on Welcome! by renaissanceartandmusic http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/2013/01/07/welcome/comment-page-1/#comment-2 Tue, 15 Jan 2013 13:58:35 +0000 http://renaissanceartandmusic.com/?p=22#comment-2 Hi Geoff, thanks for visiting the page. I can imagine how useful the Kerman book was pedagogically in standing Renaissance art and music side by side and letting the readers/students draw their own conclusions about possible links or incompatibilities. We are gearing the research training meetings to PGs and UGs, so we would definitely be keen for your observations and experience from teaching.
-Matthew

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